Wishful Thinking

This video popped up on my Newsfeed today.  Give it a watch.  It’s pretty powerful.

What would you write on the board?

Everything I’d write has to do with my career.  It’s hard to call them regrets, because I wouldn’t change any of the decisions I’ve made.  I don’t regret what I did in supporting my husband.  I love where we are now, and so much of that is because of the sacrifices we’ve both made over the years.  But I do wish that I’d been able to do some things that just haven’t worked out for me yet.

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Things I’ve Picked Up from Hanging Out with / Being Facebook Friends with College Professors

I have a lot of teacher friends.  Not colleagues or coworkers – friends.  I hang out with them on weekends and watch Packers games with them.  Some are related to me, some by blood and others by marriage, so we share in family gatherings.  And, yeah, we’re Facebook friends.  Like anyone, they post about the joys and frustrations of their jobs occasionally (within reason – no name dropping or boss bashing).  And some of these friends teach at the college level.

This post is directed at my younger readers – the teens who are not yet in college and the young adults making their way through higher education now.  Kids, when I say I know what you need to do to get ready for college, it’s not just because I’ve been there before.  I may also be friends with your future professors.  They tell me things – things that probably should be common sense, but apparently isn’t since they’re dealing with this stuff on a daily basis.  So consider me your inside source on college professors and take this well-meaning advice, both for your sake and theirs. Keep reading!

The gears are still turning.

I got a call from a teacher friend yesterday.  She calls a lot, actually.  She likes to use me as a sounding board as she plans out her curriculum and lesson plans.  Yesterday she was formulating a plan for an independent reading project, but over the years and countless phone hours we’ve hashed through job applications, challenging students, and administration difficulties as well as mountains of curriculum ideas.  Truthfully, she’s very good at her job, so my end of the conversation usually ends up sounding like various forms of the phrase, “yeah, that sounds good.”  Occasionally I offer ideas or raise a concern or two, but mostly, I think she just needs to talk through whatever it is that she’s planning, and I’m an understanding ear willing to listen.

I like it.  I feel like it keeps me fresh, keeps my brain engaged in a field that could have easily passed me by time after time.  It’s funny when I compare our career trajectories, though.  We like to say we’ve had some very similar experiences.  We met in college and went through our first year teaching at the same time.  A few years later we found ourselves job hunting again at the same time.  We’ve both worked in an urban demographic for a year, and both left knowing that it wasn’t the right place for us.  We have a similar way of relating to teenagers, both enjoy teaching literature more than writing, and share many pedagogical perspectives.

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On Teaching Job Applications 

I went into “application mode” yesterday.  It’s a weird mental zone teachers must enter to fill out their pages and pages of job applications.  Adults in other professions, give me some perspective.  Do job applications in other fields come with an average of 12 essay questions attached?  (That’s a literal number, not an exaggeration.)  In addition to the standard questions about training, work history, and individual strengths and weaknesses, do you have to elaborate on things like educational philosophies, disciplinary and instructional strategies, and hypothetical interpersonal situations for pages at a time?  Or are teachers alone in this?  And of course, the questions are just different enough that I can’t simply copy and paste answers between one application and another.  I shudder to think of the number of hours of my life I’ve spent simply on job application essay questions.

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Teacher Strengths: Individual and Universal

Subbing in three different schools at once offers some unique insight into the teaching world.  I think I notice it more now because the three schools I’m in now vary so widely in size and demographic.  Between my observations of teachers in each setting and my conversations with my personal teacher friends, I’ve thought a lot about an individual teacher’s ability to do their job well.  What factors separate a good teacher from an average one?  What’s the balance between training, setting, and natural talent?  After letting these thoughts percolate for a few weeks (yes, I’m behind on my blog posting, I know), I’ve reached two conclusions.

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A Contrast in Attitudes

Through circumstances that can only be considered coincidence, I’ve found myself reading a lot about the educational situation in Pakistan lately.  OK, I’ve read two books related to the topic, which isn’t a lot, but enough to get me thinking – especially since I never really set out to learn about it in the first place.

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the TalibanFirst I read I am Malala by Malala Yousafzai, because I was curious about the 17-year-old girl who became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize.  Talk about remarkable teenagers, right??  Now I’m reading Three Cups of Tea by David Oliver Relin.  My mom gave me the book because she liked it, but it ended up in storage before I got a chance to read it.  After unpacking our book boxes, I’m finally able to catch up on things like this.  Relin tells the story of Greg Mortenson, an adventurous mountain climber who accidentally stumbled on the needs of the children in the remote Pakistani villages.  Through sheer dedication and determination, he has gone on to build several schools in Pakistan.

Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace...One School at a Time Keep reading!

Still Growing

Boxes1

This is what our “nursery” looked like for a long time. We’re slowly chipping away at it. (Photo credit: wikimedia commons).

Now that we’re settled in a more permanent place, I have the task of sorting through all those boxes that have been collecting in storage over the years.  The basic home-living type boxes were unpacked early and quickly.  Those were fun to open – discovering items I’d forgotten that we own, since we hadn’t used them in so many years.  I opened one box and discovered a set of bowls that I’d been missing ever since we moved to Boston.  We found Nerf guns, stuffed animals, camping supplies, renaissance faire costumes… all that we hadn’t used in years.  It was like Christmas!

Next we purchased some bookshelves off Craigslist and unpacked our many boxes of books.  There were less surprises in those boxes, but it was nice to once again be able to see what we own and arrange them on our shelves, instead of keeping it all in storage.

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Failure and Flexibility in Intentional Young Adulthood

A friend recently sent me a book recommendation with the comment that she thought of me when she read it because she knew I had “a passion for intentional adulthood.”  I don’t think I’ve ever used that exact term before, but it is a good description.  Growing up doesn’t just happen.  Careers, education, and success don’t accidentally appear in someone’s life – at some point people need to act, choose, and pursue the kind of lives they want.  Those words all imply intentionality.  Yes, opportunities come unexpectedly, and new interests surprise us sometimes, but only if we’re out living life instead of sitting back waiting for it to happen.

Passive education doesn’t even look realistic. (Image credit: Wikipedia)

For students, this means engaging in active learning and taking personal responsibility in their education and maturation.  For adults, this means pursuing a goal with purpose.  We can and should be intentional in our careers, communities, and families.  Make the decision to achieve something, and then take the steps necessary to make it happen.

However, the problem with intentional living is that we can’t do it in a vacuum.  We live among other people, and what they do impacts our lives, too.  What happens when life isn’t all smooth sailing?   Keep reading!

Obligatory “Back-to-School” post

It’s taken me a while to figure out that “back-to-school” time does bring changes for me this year, despite my lack of employment.  Initially, I watched the hype unfold with a sense of detachment.  I walked past sale racks of notebooks and pens without feeling the urge to walk through and pick out fun new stuff.  My friends went to their meetings, posted pictures of classrooms on Facebook, and even asked my advice on curriculum, but none of it seemed to really apply to me.  It wasn’t until I drove past a school building and saw kids and parents streaming in and out of it that I was jolted into reality.

My plan is to sub this year.  It’s my fallback when I don’t have other consistent employment, and all-in-all, I don’t hate it.  It gets me into the classroom, spending time with teenagers, using the skills that make me good at what I do.  Sometimes it leads to connections and more long-term work, too.  And of course, subbing leads to stories that make good blog posts.  🙂

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Appreciating Other Teachers

It’s teacher appreciation week, when excess (and excellent) food appears in the teacher’s lounge and Chipotle offers a free burrito to anyone with a valid teaching ID.  It’s a good week.  Some of the parents at my school are ordering Chinese for the whole staff tomorrow, and yesterday a stack of papers covered in notes from my students appeared in my school mailbox.  It’s nice to be appreciated.

In the spirit of teacher appreciation week, I want to take a moment to reflect on the individuals who constantly inspire me to be a better teacher. I am surrounded by amazing, quality teachers. Yes, I have seen my share of less-than-inspiring teachers, too, but I am honestly awed by the caliber of individuals that are also in this field with me.

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