More From “Start Here”

In my last post, I discussed the practical advice on doing hard things from Brett and Alex Harris’s book Start Here.  The bulk of the rest of the book is spent on the mindset of a rebelutionary – not on the need to do hard things (that’s what their first book was for), but on how to think and act and live like a rebelutionary.  They covered topics from dealing with peers who don’t understand and time management to keeping up the motivation and how to respond to the unintended consequences, both positive and negative, that come from doing things that go against the cultural grain.  And over and over again, they bring it back to full dependency on God.

17 yr. old Zac Sunderland on the cover of ESPN magazine (photo via therebelution.com)

I was impressed with how strongly they warn against pride that may come from the attention and praise that may come from doing hard things.  Teens that have followed the rebelutionary lifestyle have made it on the cover of ESPN magazine, have written their own books, and have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for various charitable organizations and social causes.  Brett and Alex themselves have been interviewed by media venues such as NPR and The New York Times for their work.  In Start Here they very candidly address the dangers of such attention.  They remind readers that everything they do is through dependency on God, and when they remember that, pride is transformed into humble thankfulness to God for allowing them to be a part of His work.  As they so often remind the reader, they don’t want to be considered exceptional, special, or “better” than other young people.  They sincerely believe that ALL teenagers have the capabilities to do hard things when they break away from society’s low expectations and make themselves faithful to God. Continue reading

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Adulthood Defined

Holy 24 hours, Batman!  Since my post yesterday, I’ve received three different phone calls and multiple e-mails and facebook responses, in addition to the comments posted here.  I ask you all to bear with me, as this whole “blogging about a potentially controversial issue” thing is new to me, and definitely a learning process!  The responses to my last post have run a wide range from full support to complete disagreement, and everything in between.  It’s interesting see all the different perspectives that different people bring to this topic from their own life experiences.  I sincerely appreciate all the interest people have taken in what I have to say.

I think I should have been more careful about what I’m not saying, though.  I’m not saying that to be considered an adult, all the pieces of your life must fall completely into place by age (fill in the blank).  I took longer than four years to graduate college.  I’ve worked seven jobs in three states in the last four years, and my husband and I are far from being settled.  We both are experiencing career shifts that require spending time in grad school, and he’s much further along in that process than I am!  I have dear friends that are single and still live with their parents for very valid reasons, and I know that they are responsible adults.  Adulthood has become less of a list of outside requirements and has more to do the individual’s maturity and sense of responsibility. Continue reading